BlogNews

News, ideas, and analysis from J-PAL staff and affiliated professors. Subscribe to our newsletter to receive monthly email updates.

Tackling crime and violence in Latin America with cognitive behavioral therapy

Thursday, December 14, 2017, by Isabel Mejía Fontanot

Developing new strategies to reduce crime and violence is a top priority for Latin American policymakers. Much of the violence in the region affects young men as both victims and perpetrators. Finding proven ways of working with this population to reduce violent and criminal behavior has been a challenge.

One part of an effective prevention strategy may lie in efforts to slow down the thinking and decision-making processes of young... Read More

Preventing non-communicable diseases with evidence-based policy: UC Berkeley Professor Paul Gertler visits J-PAL LAC

Tuesday, December 12, 2017, by Eduardo Cifuentes

According to the WHO, deaths associated with non-communicable diseases, or NCDs, have increased worldwide in the past two decades, with higher growth rates in developing countries. NCDs like heart disease, cancer, and diabetes are responsible for almost 70 percent of the world’s deaths, even though many of these diseases are preventable. 

Chile, where J-PAL’s Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) office is based, has high rates of risk... Read More

Affiliate spotlight: Simone Schaner on her health behaviors research

Tuesday, December 5, 2017, by Charlotte Goff

Simone Schaner is an assistant professor of economics at Dartmouth College and the University of Southern California. She has been a J-PAL affiliate since 2013.

How did you become interested in development economics?

My interest started when I took development economics as an undergraduate. A big thank you to Garance Genicot at Georgetown for introducing the subject in such an inspiring way! I went on to write my economics senior thesis on microfinance—which let me spend some time in the field in Bangladesh—and I’ve been hooked ever since. Read More

The potential for evidence-based policymaking in the Middle East and North Africa: Answering frequently asked questions

Monday, December 4, 2017, by Robert Rogers

Most people we meet don’t know that J-PAL has regional offices around the world, based at universities in Chile, France, India, Indonesia, South Africa, and a US office also based at MIT. These offices lead policy outreach and support our affiliated professors’ research projects in those regions. 

Over the last few years we’ve been working to expand J-PAL’s... Read More

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What does women’s labor force participation really tell us about women’s empowerment?

Tuesday, November 21, 2017, by Lucia Diaz-Martin, Rachel Glennerster, and Ariella Park

Women continue to participate in the labor market—or as non-economists would put it, “work”—at different rates than men. According to International Labor Organization (ILO) estimates in 2016, 49.5 percent of working-age women worldwide were in the workforce, compared to 76 percent of working-age men.

Measuring these inequalities and differences is difficult. For example, data on informal labor or care work is scarce—and interpreting what employment data indicates about... Read More

Rachel Glennerster on a large stage

When do innovation and evidence change lives?

Wednesday, November 15, 2017, by Rachel Glennerster

Innovate, test, then scale. The sequence seems obvious—but is in fact a radical departure. Too often the policy making process looks more like “have a hunch, find an anecdote, then claim success.”

Over the last decade and more, though, many individuals and organizations have invested in this new model of development. We’ve learned a lot including about how to improve learning, reduce extreme poverty, combat violence, and improve women’s empowerment.... Read More

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Twitter recap: J-PAL and IPA’s financial inclusion Twitter chat

Wednesday, November 8, 2017, by Lucia Diaz-Martin

On October 31, J-PAL’s Finance Sector staff and IPA’s Financial Inclusion Program staff co-hosted a Twitter chat as part of the Center for Financial Inclusion’s Financial Inclusion Week (#FinclusionWeek). We invited people on Twitter to ask us anything about the evidence in financial inclusion, and we received questions on a range of topics.

For those who missed it, we’re recapping the conversation here so you can catch... Read More

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