BlogNews

News, ideas, and analysis from J-PAL staff and affiliated professors. Subscribe to our newsletter to receive monthly email updates.

Gender

J-PAL's new Gender sector

Tuesday, March 6, 2018, by Lucia Diaz-Martin and Seema Jayachandran

“Do you agree with the statement, “Men are better suited than women to work outside the home”?”

Seema asked parents in India this question as part of a research study to understand how a school-based program designed to change attitudes about gender roles could help reduce gender bias in Haryana, India.

According to recent World Bank estimates, only 27 percent of women in India currently participate in the labor force—a steep ten percentage point decrease from 2005 rates. This large decrease is notable because, according to analysis by J-PAL affiliate Rohini Pande (Harvard) and Charity Troyer Moore, about one-third of women who work primarily in housework would like to have a job but seem to be prevented by traditional gender norms that restrict women’s mobility. Read More

People meeting

What have we learned about building a culture of data and evidence use in government?

Monday, February 5, 2018, by Samantha Carter, Julu Beth Katticaran, Claudia Macías, and Claire Walsh

Earlier this month, we wrote about how partnerships funded by J-PAL’s Government Partnership Initiative (GPI) have helped increase governments’ use of data and evidence in policymaking in places like Chile, India, Peru, and Zambia.

One common theme across all of GPI’s partnerships is that they are led by a champion in government who is making evidence-informed policy a priority. We could not contribute data and evidence to policy decisions without their leadership and dedication. Read More

Manishah Shah

Affiliate spotlight: Manisha Shah on her research on adolescent sexual and reproductive health

Friday, February 2, 2018, by Charlotte Goff and Manisha Shah

J-PAL affiliated professor Manisha Shah is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. Her primary research questions and teaching interests lie at the intersection of applied microeconomics, health, and education.

How did you become interested in development economics?

My childhood experiences in developing countries probably had a lot to do with it. I still remember my first trip to India... Read More

Affiliate spotlight: Simone Schaner on her health behaviors research

Tuesday, December 5, 2017, by Charlotte Goff

Simone Schaner is an assistant professor of economics at Dartmouth College and the University of Southern California. She has been a J-PAL affiliate since 2013.

How did you become interested in development economics?

My interest started when I took development economics as an undergraduate. A big thank you to Garance Genicot at Georgetown for introducing the subject in such an inspiring way! I went on to write my economics senior thesis on microfinance—which let me spend some time in the field in Bangladesh—and I’ve been hooked ever since. Read More

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What does women’s labor force participation really tell us about women’s empowerment?

Tuesday, November 21, 2017, by Lucia Diaz-Martin, Rachel Glennerster, and Ariella Park

Women continue to participate in the labor market—or as non-economists would put it, “work”—at different rates than men. According to International Labor Organization (ILO) estimates in 2016, 49.5 percent of working-age women worldwide were in the workforce, compared to 76 percent of working-age men.

Measuring these inequalities and differences is difficult. For example, data on informal labor or care work is scarce—and interpreting what employment data indicates about... Read More

Girls in uniform sit in classroom

International Day of the Girl Child: How do we close the gender gap in school participation?

Wednesday, October 11, 2017, by Lucia Diaz-Martin

International Day of the Girl Child aims to, in the words of the United Nations, "address the needs and challenges girls face worldwide, while promoting girls' empowerment and the fulfillment of their human rights." As Goal 4 of the SDGs notes, education is one of the most basic human rights—and yet girls in low-income countries are less likely to be enrolled in school than their male peers, and... Read More

Is it time to rethink how we measure women’s household decision-making power in impact evaluations?

Wednesday, September 6, 2017, by Rachel Glennerster and Claire Walsh

One of the first rules of thumb you learn about developing survey questions is that they should be specific and time-bound. In other words, it’s better if a question is about a specific event or behavior rather than a vague idea so respondents are less likely to interpret it in different ways, and it should include a clear timeframe so that their responses are comparable. Read More

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